Wilderness review

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Goodreads says: Addison Goodheart is a mystery even to himself. He was born in an isolated home surrounded by a deep forest, never known to his father, kept secret from everyone but his mother, who barely accepts him. She is haunted by private demons and keeps many secrets—none of which she dreads more than the young son who adores her. 
 
Only in the woods, among the wildlife, is Addison truly welcome. Only there can he be at peace. Until the day he first knows terror, the day when his life changes radically and forever . 

I’m afraid this book failed to excite me whatsoever.  I don’t know what it is about Koontz lately that seems to make me go “blah” when he used to be one of my favorite authors.

The character seemed a compilation of several previous characters of Koontz – there was no originality that I could discern.  I suppose this happens after writing dozens of books.

The ending was abrupt and left me disgusted – I will not buy the book that this was a prequel for (Innocence) because I wasn’t impressed with the work that went into this novelette.

Sorry, Koontz, but you slide further down my “favorites” list all the time – write like you did in “Watchers”, “Phantoms”, “Cold Fire”, “Whispers”…etc., I miss that author.

The Holy Spirit

the holy spirit

Finished this book this morning at work.  It was my first Billy Graham book – I don’t know why it took me so long to get around to reading him.  Non-fiction books are always harder for me to get through than fiction – they take longer and I feel like I should come away from each chapter having learned something I didn’t know, otherwise, why am I reading it?

This book was on the subject of the Holy Spirit and where he fits in the Trinity as well as our lives.  Some of it was way over my head which made it harder to get through while other areas were very basic so stuff I already knew.  However, I came away from reading it with a deeper understanding of the Holy Spirit, God and the Trinity.

Graham’s examples are refreshing and applicable to our individual lives today.  He also goes over the gifts of the Spirit and the fruits of the Spirit.  I felt it was eye opening and have shared some of what I’ve learned already so that means it is a successful non-fiction book.

If you have a desire in your soul to know more about the Holy Spirit, this is an excellent book.  I give the book an A.

What’s in your mailbox?

mailboxes mailbox

So what have people been up to? What great purchases, gifts, or finds have you made in the book department? I know it has been a while since I shared my mailbox ~ I have purchased quite a few since the last post.  However, today I purchased the following two books:

lost lake sugar queen

I hope they are both as good as Allen’s other books.  I am debating buying the new Odd Thomas book by Dean Koontz…I am believe it is called “Odd Hours” but I’m not sure.  I’ve always liked the Odd Thomas books but it has been so long since I read them that I would probably have to start the series over again to get back in sync with the new book.

The Peach Keeper review

peach

Goodreads:  Walls of Water, North Carolina, where the secrets are thicker than the fog from the town’s famous waterfalls, and the stuff of superstition is just as real as you want it to be.

It’s the dubious distinction of thirty-year-old Willa Jackson to hail from a fine old Southern family of means that met with financial ruin generations ago. The Blue Ridge Madam—built by Willa’s great-great-grandfather during Walls of Water’s heyday, and once the town’s grandest home—has stood for years as a lonely monument to misfortune and scandal. And Willa herself has long strived to build a life beyond the brooding Jackson family shadow. No easy task in a town shaped by years of tradition and the well-marked boundaries of the haves and have-nots.

But Willa has lately learned that an old classmate—socialite do-gooder Paxton Osgood—of the very prominent Osgood family, has restored the Blue Ridge Madam to her former glory, with plans to open a top-flight inn. Maybe, at last, the troubled past can be laid to rest while something new and wonderful rises from its ashes. But what rises instead is a skeleton, found buried beneath the property’s lone peach tree, and certain to drag up dire consequences along with it.

For the bones—those of charismatic traveling salesman Tucker Devlin, who worked his dark charms on Walls of Water seventy-five years ago—are not all that lay hidden out of sight and mind. Long-kept secrets surrounding the troubling remains have also come to light, seemingly heralded by a spate of sudden strange occurrences throughout the town.

Now, thrust together in an unlikely friendship, united by a full-blooded mystery, Willa and Paxton must confront the dangerous passions and tragic betrayals that once bound their families—and uncover truths of the long-dead that have transcended time and defied the grave to touch the hearts and souls of the living.

Resonant with insight into the deep and lasting power of friendship, love, and tradition, The Peach Keeper is a portrait of the unshakable bonds that—in good times and bad, from one generation to the next—endure forever.

Started this book over last night at work because I had barely gotten through the first chapter when circumstances forced me to stop.  It was no reflection on the book, I promise.

I knew by the end of the third chapter that I was not going to get the book finished at work because I started it too late in the shift.  As always, I promised myself that I would only read it for an hour when I got home but I ended up reading three hours until finished.

The story is an old one – people who have misconceptions about each other based on impressions they got during high school.  It centers around four people in general: The Joker, the Stick Man, the Princess and the Freak which is actually the name of one of the chapters.

There isn’t much I didn’t like about the story.  As usual, Allen weaves a touch of the magical through the book which I always find delightful.  In fact, if it weren’t for the slightly magical tidbits she adds, I don’t know that I would read her.  The stories are good but that little twist gives me an upbeat, warm feeling that there more to this wondrous world we live in.  It enchants me.

In fact, that is my only complaint about this book – there wasn’t enough magic in it compared to her other books.  The characters weren’t overly amazing as far as amazing characters go.  It was hard not to like them and no doubt each reader will be able to identify with one more strongly than the others.

Overall, I liked the book and give it an A.  I often recommend Allen to my friends and family as one of those writers who is perfect for a cold winter night or a day at the beach.  You can sit back and enjoy the story from the first page all the way to the end – like a magical carpet ride.

Six Books Behind

It is only the end of February and already I am six books behind in my goal to read 50 books this year.  I don’t know why I am struggling so when it comes to reading these days.  You would think as often as we have been snowed in that I would be six books ahead.

I am still trying to read “The Peach Keeper” but am having difficulty concentrating.  Don’t you hate reading a page over and over but can’t remember a thing it said when you turn to the next one?  I find myself zoning out too – sitting there staring at the writing for minutes at a time, lost in thoughts that have nothing to do with the book.

We have another snowstorm headed our way and I am determined to read and work on my projects rather than watch TV or play games on Facebook.  Man, I am really ready for spring.

The Siren’s Song

Siren's Song cover

So this is the new cover for “The Siren’s Song” which is for sale on B&N and Amazon in ebook format this coming week and soon to be in paperback.  I love the cover and want to thank the following people:

Jade Eby, author of “Right Kind of Wrong” and “Whiskey and a Gun”, for all her help getting my manuscript edited and finding the cover for me.  She had to answer dozens of questions, uploading files and all that good stuff.  You can check her out at http://www.jadeeby.com or http://chasingemptypavements.wordpress.com.

Rachel Lynn Solomon, editor, who edited my manuscript…the poor woman.  Her turn around time is amazing – less than a week – and her detailed edits are amazing.  If you need a manuscript edited, you can find her at – http://rlynnsolomon.blogspot.com/p/editing-services.html?m=0.  I will use her for all my edits – I bet she cringes when she reads that.  LOL.

Madelene Martin for the awesome cover! I reviewed several before I chose the one above.  I wasn’t too sure about the typeset so Martin played with several fonts for me until I decided that, yes, the original was perfect.  She was very helpful and will be my first “go-to” person for future covers.  You can see her work (and others) at http://thebookcoverdesigner.com/premade-book-covers/

So there you are.  I don’t expect you all to run out and buy a copy but I did want to update the changes to the book.  :-)

It’s Sunday, What’s in Your Mailbox?

mailboxes colorful

You know, it has always bothered me that someone started this weekly update stuff with mail on Sunday.  They haven’t delivered mail on Sunday since the stone age.  But oh well, I guess in this age of electronic downloads, no one needs to wait on the mail anymore.

So today I added the following book to my collection: The Peach Keeper

The New York Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Chased the Moon welcomes you to her newest locale: Walls of Water, North Carolina, where the secrets are thicker than the fog from the town’s famous waterfalls, and the stuff of superstition is just as real as you want it to be.

It’s the dubious distinction of thirty-year-old Willa Jackson to hail from a fine old Southern family of means that met with financial ruin generations ago. The Blue Ridge Madam—built by Willa’s great-great-grandfather during Walls of Water’s heyday, and once the town’s grandest home—has stood for years as a lonely monument to misfortune and scandal. And Willa herself has long strived to build a life beyond the brooding Jackson family shadow. No easy task in a town shaped by years of tradition and the well-marked boundaries of the haves and have-nots.

But Willa has lately learned that an old classmate—socialite do-gooder Paxton Osgood—of the very prominent Osgood family, has restored the Blue Ridge Madam to her former glory, with plans to open a top-flight inn. Maybe, at last, the troubled past can be laid to rest while something new and wonderful rises from its ashes. But what rises instead is a skeleton, found buried beneath the property’s lone peach tree, and certain to drag up dire consequences along with it.

For the bones—those of charismatic traveling salesman Tucker Devlin, who worked his dark charms on Walls of Water seventy-five years ago—are not all that lay hidden out of sight and mind. Long-kept secrets surrounding the troubling remains have also come to light, seemingly heralded by a spate of sudden strange occurrences throughout the town.

Now, thrust together in an unlikely friendship, united by a full-blooded mystery, Willa and Paxton must confront the dangerous passions and tragic betrayals that once bound their families—and uncover truths of the long-dead that have transcended time and defied the grave to touch the hearts and souls of the living.

Resonant with insight into the deep and lasting power of friendship, love, and tradition, The Peach Keeper is a portrait of the unshakable bonds that—in good times and bad, from one generation to the next—endure forever.